Immunology of Infectious Diseases

Recent research in laboratories is primarily focused on infectious diseases in developing countries. Laboratory-based research may be supplemented by field-based studies of epidemiological and ecological aspects of infectious disease transmission and control.

Current immune-mediated and infectious disease includes HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, Malaria, Pneumonia, Enteric Diseases, and Autoimmune diseases. In future, immunological studies concentrate on genetic regulation of the immune response, the reciprocity of innate immune system and intestinal microbial communities, the functioning and regulation of T-cell-derived cytokines and cytokines involved in the inflammation regulation.

Recent studies shown that basic pathogenic mechanisms  lead to development of advanced diagnostic tools and  vaccines used in  prevention and control of infection and disease and the identification of new targets for antiviral and ant parasitic drugs. The battle between pathogens and the host immune defenses has raged for thousands of years. 

The immune system has succeeded in exploring varied approaches to control parasitic infections ranging from direct killing to developing cytokines that hamper replication.  Pathogens are encountered with developing immune evasion mechanisms that inhibit functioning of cytokines and arrest immune recognition of infected cells. Efforts carried out to interpret and signalize the opposing mechanisms will assuredly generate improvised treatment of infectious diseases ranging from AIDS and parasitic infections to sexually transmitted diseases and the common cold.